शुक्रवार, 7 मार्च 2014

सेहत और पर्यावरण की नव्ज़ लिए है ये पोस्ट

सेहत और पर्यावरण की नव्ज़ लिए है ये पोस्ट 

हरा धनिया (Coriander )फोलिक एसिड ,विटामिन -A,बीटा -कैरोटीन 

एवं 

विटामिन C का बेहतरीन स्रोत है। आवश्यक हैं ये सभी हमारी सेहत के 

लिए। 

पालक (Spinach )खाद्य रेशों और जल से लबालब रहता है 

कब्जी(Constipation ) दूर करता है ,पाचन ट्रेक्ट (पाचन सम्बद्ध क्षेत्र )को 

भी दुरुस्त रखता है। 

एक बेल होती है जिसके फूलों से बीयर बनती है इसे कहा जाता है 

BEER -

HOP. इसमें मौज़ूद रहतें हैं कुछ ख़ास एंटीऑक्सीडेंट्स पोली -फिनोल्स 

मसूढ़ों की बीमारी तथा दांतों को खोखला होने से बचाते हैं बीयर हॉप। 


BEER HOP LEAVES COULD BATTLE DENTAL DISEASES 

Antioxidents polyphenols ,contained in the hop leaves (called bracts )could help fight cavities and gum disease .Extracts from bracts stopped the bacteria responsible for these dental conditions from being able to stick to surfaces and prevented the releasing toxins .





Cut sugar consumption by half: WHO

The World Health Organisation says your daily sugar intake should be just 5 per cent of your total calories. Photo: AP

Cut sugar consumption by half :WHO

Only 5 per cent of your daily calorie intake should be from sugar, agency says

 Just try sugar-coating this: The World Health Organisation says your daily sugar intake should be just 5 per cent of your total calories - half of what the agency previously recommended, according to new draft guidelines published yesterday (March 5).

After a review of about 9,000 studies, WHO’s expert panel says dropping sugar intake to that level will combat obesity and cavities. That includes sugars added to foods and those present in honey, syrups and fruit juices, but not those occurring naturally in fruits.

Dr Francesco Branca, WHO’s director for nutrition, conceded the new target was somewhat aspirational.


“We should aim for 5 per cent if we can ... but 10 per cent is more realistic,” he said in a news conference.
Americans and others in the West eat a lot more sugar than that: Their average sugar intake would have to drop by two-thirds to meet WHO’s suggested limit.
WHO’s new guidelines have been published online and the agency is inviting the public to comment via its website until the end of March.
Many doctors applauded the United Nations agency’s attempt to limit the global sweet tooth.
“The less sugar you’re eating, the better,” said Dr Robert Lustig, a professor of paediatrics at the University of California and author of a book about the dangers of sugar. “If the sugar threshold is lowered, I think breakfast cereal is going to have a really hard time justifying its existence,” he said, referring to sweetened cereals often targeted to children.
When WHO last revised its sugar guidelines more than a decade ago, it recommended sugar should be less than 10 per cent of daily calories. The United States sugar industry was so incensed it lobbied Congress to threaten to withdraw millions of dollars in funding to WHO. A contentious reference to the sugar limit was removed from a global diet strategy, but the recommendation passed.
Dr Lustig said WHO’s new guidelines could alter the food environment by forcing manufacturers to rethink how they’re using sugar in processed foods like bread, soups, pasta sauces and even salad dressings. He called the amount of sugar in processed food an “absolute, unmitigated disaster”.
WHO’s expert group found high sugar consumption is strongly linked to obesity and tooth decay. It noted that heavy people have a higher risk of chronic diseases, responsible for more than 60 per cent of global deaths. Dental care costs up to 10 per cent of health budgets in Western countries and cause significant problems in the developing world.
WHO warned many of the sugars eaten today are hidden in processed foods, pointing out that one tablespoon of ketchup contains about one teaspoon of sugar and that for some people, including children, drinking a single can of sweetened soda would already exceed their daily sugar limit.
There is no universally agreed consensus on how much sugar is too much.
The American Heart Association advises limiting sugar to about 8 per cent of your diet, or six teaspoons a day for women and nine for men. A study led by the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention published last month found too much sugar can raise the chances of fatal heart problems. Researchers found the average American gets about 15 per cent of their calories from sugar, similar to other Western nations.
New nutrition labels proposed in the US will also require food manufacturers to list any added sugars, plus a more prominent calorie count.
Earlier this week, Britain’s chief medical officer, Dr Sally Davies, said she thought sugar might be addictive and that the government should consider introducing a sugar tax to curb bulging waistlines. The United Kingdom has one of the fattest populations in Western Europe.
“We have a generation of children who, because they’re overweight ... may not live as long as my generation,” she told a health committee. “They will be the first generation that lives less and that is of great concern.” AP

Eating too much meat and eggs is ‘just as bad as smoking’, claim scientists

A study appears to show an overwhelming link between life-threatening diseases and eating meats, eggs, milk, and cheese

Middle-aged people who eat protein-rich food are four times more likely to die of cancer than someone who only eats a little, according to a new study.

The researchers said eating a lot of protein increased the risk of cancer almost as much as smoking 20 cigarettes a day.
They reached their findings, published in the journal Cell: Metabolism, after tracking thousands of people over 20 years.
“We provide convincing evidence that a high-protein diet - particularly if the proteins are derived from animals - is nearly as bad as smoking for your health,” one of the academics behind the work, Dr Valter Longo, of the University of Southern California, told The Daily Telegraph.

A high-protein diet was defined as one in which 20 per cent of the calories came from protein. They recommended eating 0.8g of protein per kilogram of body weight a day during middle age.
However the researchers said protein had benefits during later life.
Dr Eileen Crimmins, a co-author of the study, said: “We also propose that at older ages, it may be important to avoid a low-protein diet to allow the maintenance of healthy weight and protection from frailty.”

However Dr Gunter Kuhnle, a food nutrition scientist at the University of Reading, criticised the study for making a link to smoking.
“While this study raises some interesting perspectives on links between protein intake and mortality… It is wrong, and potentially even dangerous, to compare the effects of smoking with the effect of meat and cheese,” he said.
“The smoker thinks: 'Why bother quitting smoking if my cheese and ham sandwich is just as bad for me?'”
And Professor Tim Key, of Cancer Research UK, said: “Further research is needed to establish whether there is any link between eating a high protein diet and an increased risk of middle aged people dying from cancer.”

Warming may sink 136 of 700 heritage sites 
Climate change is threatening the world's cultural heritage with scientists estimating that 136 of 700 listed cultural monuments by Unesco will soon be under water. 


A new study by Ben Marzeion from the University of Innsbruck and Anders Levermann from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research said that from the Statue of Liberty in New York to the Tower of London and the Sydney Opera House -- sea-level rise will not only affect settlement areas but also numerous world heritage sites listed by Unesco. 

The monuments are in Unesco's World Heritage List. 

Nearly one-fifth of world cultural heritage sites would be affected by global warming of a further three degrees Celsius, they said. 

If global average temperature increases by just one degree Celsius more than 40 of these sites will be threatened by the water during the next 2000 years. 

With a temperature increase of three degrees, about one fifth of the cultural world heritage will be affected in the long term. 

"Around 136 sites will be below sea-level in the long-run in that case if no protection measures are taken," Marzeion said. "The fact that tides and storm surges could already affect these cultural sites much earlier has not even been taken into account," he added. 

Among the world heritage sites affected are the historical city centres of Bruges, Naples, Istanbul and St Petersburg and a number of sites in India and China. 

"If large ice masses are melting and the water is disper .. throughout the oceans, this will also influence the Earth's gravitational field," Levermann said. 

"Sea-level rise will therefore vary between regions," he added. 

They calculated future sea-level rise for all world regions and compared these projections with today's coastal settlement areas and the sites of the cultural world heritage. "Our analysis shows how serious the long-term impacts for our cultural heritage will be if climate change is not mitigated," Levermann said. 


"The global average temperature has already increased by 0.8 degrees compared to pre-industrial levels. If our greenhouse-gas emissions increase as they have done in the past, physical models project a global warming of up to five degrees by the end of this century". 

The physical processes behind the global rise of the oceans are gradual, but they will continue for a very long time," says climate scientist Ben Marzeion. 

"This will also impact the cultural world heritage". 


Angry people 'risking heart attacks'


Having a hot temper may increase your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, according to researchers.

Rage often precedes an attack and may be the trigger, say the US researchers who trawled medical literature.
They identified a dangerous period of about two hours following an outburst when people were at heightened risk.
But they say more work is needed to understand the link and find out if stress-busting strategies could avoid such complications.

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It's not clear what causes this effect. It may be linked to the physiological changes that anger causes to our bodies, but more research is needed to explore the biology behind this”
Doireann MaddockBritish Heart Foundation
People who have existing risk factors, such as a history of heart disease, are particularly susceptible, they told the European Heart Journal.
In the two hours immediately after an angry outburst, risk of a heart attack increased nearly five-fold and risk of stroke increased more than three-fold, the data from nine studies and involving thousands of people suggests.
The Harvard School of Public Health researchers say, at a population level, the risk with a single outburst of anger is relatively low - one extra heart attack per 10,000 people per year could be expected among people with low cardiovascular risk who were angry only once a month, increasing to an extra four per 10,000 people with a high cardiovascular risk.
Five episodes of anger a day would result in around 158 extra heart attacks per 10,000 people with a low cardiovascular risk per year, increasing to about 657 extra heart attacks per 10,000 among those with a high cardiovascular risk, Dr Elizabeth Mostofsky and colleagues calculate.


Dr Mostofsky said: "Although the risk of experiencing an acute cardiovascular event with any single outburst of anger is relatively low, the risk can accumulate for people with frequent episodes of anger."
It's unclear why anger might be dangerous - the researchers point out that their results do not necessarily indicate that anger causes heart and circulatory problems.

It's unclear why anger might be dangerous - the researchers point out that their results do not necessarily indicate that anger causes heart and circulatory problems.
Experts know that chronic stress can contribute to heart disease, partly because it can raise blood pressure but also because people may deal with stress in unhealthy ways - by smoking or drinking too much alcohol, for example.
The researchers say it is worth testing what protection stress-busting strategies, such as yoga, might offer.
Doireann Maddock, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation, said: "It's not clear what causes this effect. It may be linked to the physiological changes that anger causes to our bodies, but more research is needed to explore the biology behind this.
"The way you cope with anger and stress is also important. Learning how to relax can help you move on from high-pressure situations. Many people find that physical activity can help to let off steam after a stressful day.
"If you think you are experiencing harmful levels of stress or frequent anger outbursts talk to your GP."

Angry people at increased risk of heart attacks
Scientists have confirmed hot headed people with outbursts of anger are more prone to heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems in the two hours immediately afterwards. 

Five episodes of anger a day would result in around 158 extra heart attacks per 10,000 people with a low cardiovascular risk per year, increasing to about 657 extra heart attacks per 10,000 among those with a high cardiovascular risk. 

The Harvard School of Public Health researchers say the risk with a single outburst of anger is relatively low - one extra heart attack per 10,000 people per year could be expected among people with low cardiovascular risk who were angry only once a month, increasing to an extra four per 10,000 people with a high cardiovascular risk. 
Rage often precedes an attack and may be the trigger, say the US researchers who trawled medical literature. 

They identified a dangerous period of about two hours following an outburst when people were at heightened risk. 

The meta-analysis found in the two hours immediately after feeling angry, a person's risk of a heart attack increased nearly five-fold (4.74%), the risk of stroke increased more than three-fold (3.62%). 

Senior Cardiac Nurse at the British Heart Foundation Doireann Maddock said, "This research found that people's risk of heart attack and stroke increased for a short time after they lost their temper. It's not clear what causes this effect. It may be linked to the physiological changes that anger causes to our bodies, but more research is needed to explore the biology behind this.''


Facebook Tied to Higher Risk of Eating Disorders

Provocative new research ties high Facebook use to an increased risk of eating disorders.

Florida State University investigators studied 960 college women and found that more time on Facebook was associated with higher levels of disordered eating.
Women who placed greater importance on receiving comments and “likes” on their status updates and were more likely to untag photos of themselves and compare their own photos to friends’ posted photos reported the highest levels of disordered eating.
Psychology Professor Dr. Pamela K. Keel discovered that while Facebook provides a fun way to stay connected with friends, it also presents women with a new medium through which they are confronted by a thin ideal that impacts their risk for eating disorders.
The findings were outlined in a paper, “Do You ‘Like’ My Photo? Facebook Use Maintains Eating Disorder Risk,” which was published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Home » News » Technology News » Facebook Tied to Higher Risk of Eating Disorders

Facebook Tied to Higher Risk of Eating Disorders

By  Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on March 6, 2014
Facebook Tied to Higher Risk of Eating DisordersProvocative new research ties high Facebook use to an increased risk of eating disorders.
Florida State University investigators studied 960 college women and found that more time on Facebook was associated with higher levels of disordered eating.
Women who placed greater importance on receiving comments and “likes” on their status updates and were more likely to untag photos of themselves and compare their own photos to friends’ posted photos reported the highest levels of disordered eating.
Psychology Professor Dr. Pamela K. Keel discovered that while Facebook provides a fun way to stay connected with friends, it also presents women with a new medium through which they are confronted by a thin ideal that impacts their risk for eating disorders.
The findings were outlined in a paper, “Do You ‘Like’ My Photo? Facebook Use Maintains Eating Disorder Risk,” which was published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.
While other studies have linked social media and eating disorders, the Florida State study is the first to show that spending just 20 minutes on Facebook actually contributes to the risk of eating disorders by reinforcing women’s concerns about weight and shape and increasinganxiety.
More than 95 percent of the women who participated in the study use Facebook, and those with Facebook accounts described checking the site multiple times a day, typically spending 20 minutes during each visit. That amounts to more than an hour on the site each day, according to Keel.
Researchers have long recognized the powerful impact of peer/social influences and traditional media on the risk for eating disorders. Facebook combines those factors.
“Now it’s not the case that the only place you’re seeing thin and idealized images of women in bathing suits is on magazine covers,” Keel said.
“Now your friends are posting carefully curated photos of themselves on their Facebook page that you’re being exposed to constantly. It represents a very unique merging of two things that we already knew could increase risk for eating disorders.”
The research is important because it may lead to interventions to reduce risk factors for eating disorders, which are among the most serious forms of mental illness.
“Eating disorders are associated with the highest rates of mortality of any psychiatric illness,” Keel said.
“They are associated with high rates of chronicity — they’re not things that women necessarily grow out of. We know that peer factors have a significant influence, so understanding when and how peers do things that are unhelpful to one another gives us an important opportunity to protect and prevent.”

Ironically, Facebook may be one of the best ways to employ intervention strategies, such as encouraging women to put a stop to so-called “fat talk.”
“That’s when women get together and engage in negative commentary, usually about their own body, and it gets reinforced because it’s a way women bond with one another and they get reassurance — ‘Oh, no, you don’t look fat. Look at me,’” she said.
“It’s bad for women because it reinforces how important it is to be thin and reinforces really negative talk about the self.”
Her advice to young women?
“Consider what it is you are pursuing when you post on Facebook,” she said.
“Try to remember that you are a whole person and not an object, so don’t display yourself as a commodity that then can be approved or not approved.”

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News for 'FB use tied to risk of eating disorders'


  1. PsychCentral.com ‎- 19 hours ago
    Provocative new research ties high Facebook use to an increasedrisk of eating disorders. Florida State University investigators studied 960 ...



News for angry people at increased risk of heart attacks



  1. BBC News ‎- 2 days ago
    Having a hot temper may increase your risk of having a heart attackor stroke, according to researchers. Rage often precedes an attack and ...

An Indonesian vendor sells vegetables in Jakarta.An Indonesian vendor sells vegetables in Jakarta.



News for protein rich diet as bad as smoking 20 ...


  1. The Independent ‎- 1 day ago
    ... the risk of cancer almost as much as smoking 20 cigarettes aday... A high-protein diet was defined as one in which 20 per cent of the ... They recommended eating 0.8g of protein per kilogram of body weight a day during middle age. ... smoking if my cheese and ham sandwich is just as bad for me?'”.











8 टिप्‍पणियां:

राजीव कुमार झा ने कहा…

बहुत सुन्दर एवं उपयोगी जानकारी.
नई पोस्ट : पंचतंत्र बनाम ईसप की कथाएँ

राजीव कुमार झा ने कहा…

बहुत सुंदर प्रस्तुति.
इस पोस्ट की चर्चा, शनिवार, दिनांक :- 08/03/2014 को "जादू है आवाज में":चर्चा मंच :चर्चा अंक :1545 पर.

प्रवीण पाण्डेय ने कहा…

सदा की तरह उपयोगी और रोचक सलाह।

धीरेन्द्र सिंह भदौरिया ने कहा…

उपयोगी जानकारी देती पोस्ट ...!

RECENT POST - पुरानी होली.

Vikesh Badola ने कहा…

राज-समाज की अनगिनत समस्‍याओं के बीच आपकी स्‍वास्‍थ्‍यप्रद जानकारियां एक नई दिशा में अग्रसर होने के लिए प्रेरित करती हैं।

arvind mishra ने कहा…

वीरू भाई आप अनवरत जनकल्याण में जुटे हैं -जीवन सुफल कर रहे हैं !

ताऊ रामपुरिया ने कहा…

बहुत ही उपयोगी और जन कल्याणक आलेख, आभार.

रामराम.

Anita ने कहा…

रोचक और सार्थक पोस्ट..